Appomattox and Marian Anderson: Symbolic Irony of History
April 9, 2011

Don't Buy Real Estate From This Man!

Don't Buy Real Estate From This Man!

On This Date in History: Wilmer McLean was a Virginia grocer. He probably did fairly well at his craft. But, he didn’t have much luck when it came to real estate. See, he had a patch of land not too far from the nation’s capital. The first major conflict of the Civil War was known as the Battle of Bull run and it took place on McLean’s land. Not only that, but Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard thought that the McLean house would make a good headquarters, so he comandeered it. The land was ravaged by the warfare and the house took a beating as a Union cannonball came crashing through the kitchen.

Lee's Table Not as Valuable as Grant's

Lee's Table Not as Valuable as Grant's

After the battle, which was also called the Battle of Manassas,  McLean hung on but gave up a year later when the entire episode was repeated during the Second Battle of Bull Run. Following the second episode of his home being turned inside out,  McLean picked up his family and moved to a small town some miles away in an effort to find some peace and quiet from the war.

McLean's Manassas Home No Longer His Castle After Bull Run

After a couple of years, McLean thought he’d made a good move until this date in 1865. See, Generaly Ulysses S. Grant had gotten General Robert E. Lee to abandon Petersburg and Lee’s army was on the run until finally, Lee sent Colonel Charles Marshall to find an appropriate site for a conference between the two army’s commanders near the small town of Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia which was some miles from the old McLean house. The first person that Marshall came upon was none other than Wilmer McLean. McLean first steered the colonel to an abandoned house with no furniture in it. Colonel Marshall quickly dismissed the idea. McLean felt like it was all but inevitable that the war had reached out and grabbed him again so he offered his home.

Parlor In Lower Left Hand Room

Parlor In Lower Left Hand Room

On that afternoon, General Robert E. Lee signed the articles of surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant in the front parlor of the McLean home and effectively ended the Civil War, though some skirmishes would go on for several days. Now, this was a pretty historic occasion and the soldiers on hand knew it. They wanted a piece of history. Union General Edward O.C. Ord gave McLean $40 for the table at which Grant had sat. Another Union General, either Philip Sheridan or George A. Custer, got a good deal by acquiring the table at which Lee sat for just $25. At that point, McLean figured he needed his furniture and brought an end to the impromtu rummage sale. But, less honorable individuals would have none of it. Chairs were broken up, upholstery ripped and the parlor was torn to pieces as if another cannonball had ripped through. Once again, Wilmer McLean had been touched by Civil War history…and his house took a beating. Maybe he should have moved to Texas.

Bear More Valuable Than Jesus?

Bear More Valuable Than Jesus?

The selling of the Grant table for more than the Lee table reminds me of when I lived in Birmingham. I once went into an art store. On some shelves were busts. Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest went for $500. Robert E. Lee and Jesus Christ went for $550. Bear Bryant? He went for $600! Yes indeed, it’s the bible belt and they love Robert E. Lee and Jesus, but you better not schedule a church social when Alabama football has a game!

Who knew the 1 year old girl would later sing for kings

Some 32 years after the close of the Civil War, a little girl was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  By the age of six, this young lady became known in her church as the “baby contralto.”  Recognizing her musical talent, her father bought a piano but was unable to afford lessons so the young budding prodigy simply taught herself.  In her early teens, she began accepting invitations to sing until she finally got the courage to ask for $5 per performance.  Groups were eager to pay.  Around that same time, the Philadelphia Choral Society held a benefit concert that raised $500 so that she might be able to afford voice lessons with a leading contralto of the day.  Following her high school graduation, her principal introduced her to the highly sought after vocal teacher Guiseppe Boghetti and her audition brought the man to tears.

23 years old looking as good as she sounded

Throughout the 1920’s and 1930’s, her career exploded.  She performed all over Europe at great stages such as those found in London and Berlin.  When Arturo Toscanini heard her in Salzburg at the Mozarteum international festival, the prestigious conductor told her, “Yours is a voice such as one hears once in a hundred years.”  She even performed before the King of both Sweden and Denmark.  By the late 1930’s, she was performing some 70 concerts a year in Europe, Latin America and in the United States, including at Carnegie Hall.  Wherever she went, she was welcomed to great acclaim…that is until she attempted to perform in the capital of the United States of America.  You see, Marian Anderson was one of the greatest contraltos the nation has ever produced but she was rebuffed by some who were not deaf but still could not hear.  Although a bloody Civil War had been fought that was thought to have brought freedom for all, African-Americans were not living on a level playing field in many parts of the country, including the nation’s capital.

Marian Filled the Mall After the Snub for Constitutional Hall

Washington’s Constitutional Hall was the city’s foremost venue but the city was segregated and the hall itself had separate seating based on race.  I bet I know who got the front seats.  Anyway, when Marian’s agent attempted the book the hall, he was told that it was unavailable.  It seems that, in 1935, those who ran the hall created a rule that called for only white performers.  So, while it was supposed the be the greatest venue in the city, the greatest contralto in the nation, if not the world, was not allowed in.  Marian Anderson was good enough for the crowned heads of Europe, but not Constitutional Hall.  How can such a place be considered the best when it won’t allow the best?  The First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt was so incensed that she resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution which just so happened to be the owner of Constitutional Hall.  Musicians protested and much of the public was in an uproar.  I’m not sure if President Roosevelt ever commented but, I’m sure he gave his blessing to Secretary of Interior Harold Ickes when he arranged a free open air concert for Easter Sunday.  On this date in 1939, 74 years to the day after The Army of Northern Virginia surrendered to Union forces under the command of Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant, Marian Anderson stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and performed before 75,000 adoring onlookers.  Millions more listened at home on their radios. 

I Bet Old Abe Smiled Over Marian's Shoulder

Relating to her performance, Anderson said that at first, she was reluctant to accept the invitation because she didn’t like a lot of show and that “one could not tell in advance what direction the affair would take. I studied my conscience. …. As I thought further, I could see that my significance as an individual was small in this affair. I had become, whether I like it or not, a symbol, representing my people.”  A few weeks later, Anderson performed at the White House for President Roosevelt the visiting King George VI and Queen Elizabeth of Great Britain.  Finally, in 1943, at the height of World War II, Marian Anderson performed at Constitutional Hall under the condition that the Daughter’s of the American Revolution suspend their segregationist seating policy.

Marian Anderson at New York's Metropolitan Opera 1955

While history justifiably remembers Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Marian Anderson is largely forgotten.  In a city filled with monuments that elicit great symbolism, I think it is quite fitting to remember the contralto who performed on the steps of the monument, made largely of marble from former Confederate States, to the man remembered for his  leadership in a great struggle the resulted in freedom for African Americans on the day that struggle effectively came to an end.  It’s folly to try and play the “what if” game but I do wonder for a moment that, if Marian Anderson had not performed in 1939, would Dr. King have been able to stand in literally the same spot 25 years later?  Her career flourished and she lived to see great change prior to her death in 1993 at the age of 96.  But, certainly, as her voice was one heard once in a lifetime, her legacy should be etched in the American conscience for eternity as one rarely seen in a nation’s history.

 
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Burial of Stonewall Jackson’s Left Arm; Death of Robert E. Lee’s Right Arm
May 3, 2010

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson

A youthful Thomas Jackson

On This Date in History:  In early 1861, Thomas Jonathan Jackson served as, what seems on the surface, a professor of an odd combination of disciplines.  He was a professor of philosophy and artillery tactics at Virginia Military Institute.  In spite of this lofty academic status, Jackson had a difficult time in the classroom.  He had a very limited education as a child and he barely passed his entrance examination for West Point.  In an interesting display of the dogged determination that would characterize his life, Jackson went from near the bottom of his class to 17th out of 59 when he graduated in 1846.    As it turns out, the old professor used his philosophy and his extensive knowledge relating to the evolution of the use of artillery to bring havoc to the Union Army.   You see, Thomas Jonathan Jackson is better known as Stonewall Jackson and he gained that moniker from the outset of the Civil War.

Picnic of some of Washington's elite at the First Battle of Bull Run

At the First Battle of Bull Run (aka Manassas), in July 1861, residents of Washington took the short journey to the battlefield to watch the battle.  At first, ideas of glory and heroism filled the heads of much of the citizenry and they thought that taking a picnic lunch to watch the event would be a splendid way to spend the afternoon.  At first, the fortunes of the North looked good as the men in blue shattered the Confederate line until Jackson’s men responded to fortify the defense.  Confederate General Bernard E. Bee is said to have made the observation, “See, there is Jackson standing like a stone wall!”  The Confederates staged a counteroffensive and routed the stunned Union troops, who fled back to Washington along with those who came to view the battle.  It became apparent that there was nothing glorious about modern warfare and that it was not going to be a short conflict.

Typical Jackson Posture on Horseback

Speculation regarding Jackson’s tenacity in mlitary matters and leadership may have been the result of his hypochondria.  For instance, Stonewall Jackson never put pepper on anything, claiming that it made his left leg weak.  His preference was a relatively simple meal that included bread, milk and raspberries.  When sitting, he only did so in an rigid, upright position as he said that his organs were able to sit “naturally” on top of one another.  This insistence on a consistent, erect posture resulted in a distinctive mount on his horse.  It was a perfect inspiration for his men to see their commander in a position of authority, one arm outstretched, directing his troops in battle.  It also probably made him an inviting target.  At Bull Run, Jackson took a bullet in that outstretched hand and the attended doctor suggested that his finger required amputation.  The doctor turned to get his instruments and when he turned back around, the patient had left.  General Jackson had a motto that the “Stonewall Brigade never retreats.”  When facing the instruments of a surgeon, Jackson defied his own orders and retreated on horseback rather quickly.

The Shooting of Stonewall Jackson Was Probably Not As Elaborate as this Artist's Interpretation

Jackson became attached to the Army of Northern Virginia under the command of General Robert E. Lee, who became extremely dependent on the services of General Jackson and his men.  While he was not always successful in battle as evidenced at the Seven Days Battles at Richmond in 1862, Jackson’s efforts were key in the victories of the Army of Northern Virginia at the First Battle of Bull Run, the Second Battle of Bull Run, Fredericksburg and the gallant effort at Antietam.    At Chancellorsville, VA  the Army of Northern Virginia defeated the Union’s Army of the Potomac under the command of General Joseph (Fightin’ Joe) Hooker.  That night, Jackson led a rather risky reconnaisance mission and when he came back in the dark, his men thought that his approach as a Yankee assault.  So, they dischargded their weapons and did what the Union Army had been unable to do.  On May 2, 1863, Stonewall Jackson was felled from his command by the shots of his own men.   There was much confusion in the darkness and Jackson was not attended to immediately.  When he was evacuated, the men were in such a hurry to remove him to safer quarters that he was dropped at least once from his stretcher.   Two slugs shattered his left arm.  This time, there was no escape from the surgeon.

You Can See The Headstone of Jackson's Arm

 Medicine during the Civil War was rather crude.  The understanding or infection and bacteria was just in its infancy and much of the knowledge that had come about had not yet reached the battlefield.  Also, most weapons fired .50 caliber led balls that are huge to begin with, but also tend to flatten out on impact.  Most of the time the results of the human body being hit by such a projectile were devastating.  Bones were typically not just broken but splintered into so many pieces that they were impossible to set.  Many soldiers died from shattered limbs and the only way to prevent gangrene or other complications from such an injury was amputation of the limb.  So, Jackson’s left arm was immediately amputated.  Following such trauma, a high fever quite often follows.  A high fever did strike Jackson and that indirectly led to his death.  When George Washington was ill, he ordered the doctor to continue to open wounds to try and bleed the illness from his body.  Speculation has been that Washington died from a loss of blood.  In a similar manner, Stonewall Jackson ordered servants to put cold towels on his body in an effort to lower his fever.  Some experts point to the use of cold towels as the cause of Jackson developing the pneumonia that ultimately claimed his life.   Doctors also were ignorant of his condition as they had assumed the pain he felt in his chest were simply a result of the rough handling he had suffered during his evacuation from the battlefield.   

On this date in 1863, the left arm of Stonewall Jackson was given a funeral complete with full military honors.  It was buried near Chancellorsville, VA with a marker that reads, “Arm of Stonewall Jackson.”

Dr. Hunter Holmes McGuire

When Robert E. Lee heard of the wounding of Thomas Jackson, he sent a note to the ailing general that said, “”Could I have directed events, I would have chosen for the good of the country to be disabled in your stead.”   Dr. Hunter McGuire was the attending physician and he reported that on his death bed, though Jackson became weaker, he remained spiritually strong.  Dr. McGuire wrote an account of his final hours in which the general became somewhat delirious as Jackson cried out,  “Order A.P. Hill to prepare for action! Pass the infantry to the front rapidly! Tell Major Hawks…” McGuire said that Jackson suddenly  stopped, leaving the sentence unfinished.   What followed was a smile on the face of Jackson “of ineffable sweetness spread itself over his pale face,” after which Jackson said quietly, with what the doctor described as an expression of relief,  “Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees”  The final words of Thomas Jonathan Jackson were “It is the Lord’s Day; my wish is fulfilled. I have always desired to die on Sunday.” 

Jackson gravesite

Stonewall Jackson died on May 10, 1863 and his body was removed to Richmond, VA for a public mourning.  His final resting place is the Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery in Lexington, VA.   Legend is that General Robert E. Lee, upon hearing of the passing of Jackson, told his cook, “William, I have lost my right arm.  I’m bleeding at the heart.”     You can visit Stonewall Jackson’s left arm 125 miles from the rest of his body at Ellwood Manor, aka Ellwood Plantation.

Regional Rain Through 4PM May 2, 2010

TN Rain Through Sunday AM...but Much More Fell on Sunday

Weather Bottom Line:  The forecast was pretty much on line.  The track for the Derby was a little messier than I thought it might as I had thought the track would be able to drain from rain Saturday morning.  But, I suppose getting an inch in a very short time was just too much.  We did have somewhat of a break during most of the races, once again suggesting that sensible weather notions often trumps what the computers think.  In general though, the rain totals were correct but the heaviest rain corrider was shifted about 40 miles east of our location to a Nashville-Lexington axis.  Those areas ended up with some 6-10 inches of rain.  Louisville was not out of the woods though with relatively minor, but still significant, flooding in the Southwestern part of Jefferson County.  As I had expected, Arkansas and Mississippi got the brunt of the tornadic activity.  But, counties around Memphis and Nashville had rain totals somewhere between 10 and 20 inches.  Many rivers and streams shattered record high levels.   Nashville’s two day rain totals were something in the neighborhood of 14 inches, which is double the previous two day record.

The week ahead will be one of warmer and drier weather at least for a few day.  Toward the end of the week, perhaps as early as Thursday, interesting weather may again be the topic of conversation.

 

911: I Want My Shrimp! Bad Real Estate Investor
April 9, 2009

Don't Buy Real Estate From This Man!

Don't Buy Real Estate From This Man!

Only One Shrimp? Call the Cops!

Only Three Shrimp? Call the Cops!

I want my Shrimp!  This is great and also silly at the same time.  So, this lady goes into a fast food place and orders extra shrimp with her fried rice.  She claims that she didn’t get her shrimp.  She argues with the manager and calls the cops demanding her extra shrimp.  Here’s the story with audio of the call for your amusement.

On This Date in History:  Wilmer McLean was a Virginia grocer.  He probably did fairly well at his craft.  But, he didn’t have much luck when it came to real estate.  See, he had a patch of land not too far from the nation’s capital.  The first major conflict of the Civil War was known as the Battle of Bull run and it took place on McLean’s land.  Not only that, but Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard thought that the McLean house would make a good headquarters, so he comandeered it.  The land was ravaged by the warfare and the house took a beating as a Union cannonball came crashing through the kitchen. 

Lee's Table Not as Valuable as Grant's

Lee's Table Not as Valuable as Grant's

After the battle, McLean hung on but gave up a year later when the entire episode was repeated during the Second Battle of Bull Run.  McLean picked up his family and moved to a small town some miles away. 

After a couple of years, McLean thought he’d made a good move until this date in 1865.  See, Generaly Ulysses S. Grant had gotten General Robert E. Lee to abandon Petersburg and Lee’s army was on the run until finally, Lee sent Colonel Charles Marshall to find an appropriate site for a conference between the two army’s commanders near the small town of Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia which was some miles from the old McLean house.  The first person that Marshall came upon was none other than Wilmer McLean.  McLean first steered the colonel to an abandoned house with no furniture in it.  Colonel Marshall quickly dismissed the idea.  McLean felt like it was all but inevitable that the war had reached out and grabbed him again so he offered his home. 

Parlor In Lower Left Hand Room

Parlor In Lower Left Hand Room

On that afternoon, General Robert E. Lee signed the articles of surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant in the front parlor of the McLean home and effectively ended the Civil War, though some skirmishes would go on for several days.  Now, this was a pretty historic occasion and the soldiers on hand knew it.  They wanted a piece of history.  Union General Edward O.C. Ord gave McLean $40 for the table at which Grant had sat.  Another Union General, either Philip Sheridan or George A. Custer, got a good deal by  acquiring the table at which Lee sat for just $25.  At that point, McLean figured he needed his furniture and brought an end to the impromtu rummage sale.  But, less honorable individuals would have none of it.  Chairs were broken up, upholstery ripped and the parlor was torn to pieces as if another cannonball had ripped through.  Once again, Wilmer McLean had been touched by Civil War history…and his house took a beating.  Maybe he should have moved to Texas. 

Bear More Valuable Than Jesus?

Bear More Valuable Than Jesus?

The selling of the Grant table for more than the Lee table reminds me of when I lived in Birmingham.  I once went into an art store.  On some shelves were busts.  Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest went for $500.  Robert E. Lee and Jesus Christ went for $550.  Bear Bryant?  He went for $600!    Yes indeed, it’s the bible belt and they love Robert E. Lee and Jesus, but you better not schedule a church social when Alabama football has a game!

 

Thu 8am to Fri 8am

Thu 8am to Fri 8am

Weather Bottom Line:  The weather situtation looks pretty much on track.  We still have a lead short coming out for Thursday and Friday.  Earlier I had made mention of this and thought it looked like trouble a week ago.  But, I kinda backed off as I got swayed a bit by the SPC assessment, plus the main bit of energy for the latter part of the weekend looked like the real thing.  But, as the week progressed, the indecies started coming back up for Friday and now the SPC has jumped on board by putting us in a slight risk.  What we have is two chances.  First a warm front comes through early Friday morning.  That would be one chance for strong storms.  Then after a break, the cold front comes through and we have a second chance.  The GFS has backed off somewhat on its wild indecies but they are still impressive for the afternoon while teh ETA remains less enthusiastic.  My guess is that our biggest risk will be hail and gusty winds with hail more risky with the warm front.  Now, everyone has been pooh poohing the main energy and I have to tell you that the vertical profile indecies look pretty pedestrian for Monday.  But,  when you look at the map, I’m not sure why the indecies are not more enthusiastic.  I’m not analyzing this that closely but, if the indecies are so bland, there must be some items missing whether it be CAPE or shear or the proper veering…perhaps there is some dry air or warm air aloft messing things up.  It appears to be all of the above as simply we get some cooler air for the weekend following the lead short and there simply isn’t enough time for the atmosphere to reload.  I still am a little curious as to how the second part shakes out.  We’ll just have to wait and see but I can’t ignore that the data does not support anything worthwhile on Monday.  So bottom line is risk for storms late Thursday night or early Friday and then again Friday afternoon with cooler weather for the weekend.

Fri 8am to Sat 8am

Fri 8am to Sat 8am

   DAY 2 CONVECTIVE OUTLOOK 
   NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
   1216 PM CDT THU APR 09 2009
  
   VALID 101200Z – 111200Z
  
   …THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS FROM PARTS OF THE OH AND TN
   VALLEY SWD INTO THE CNTRL/ERN GULF STATES AND EWD INTO THE
   CAROLINAS…
  
   …SYNOPSIS…
  
   AN AMPLIFIED BUT PROGRESSIVE LARGE-SCALE PATTERN WILL BE MAINTAINED
   OVER THE CONUS THROUGH THE DAY TWO PERIOD.  THE PRIMARY FEATURE OF
   INTEREST WILL BE MID/UPPER-LEVEL LOW WHICH WILL GRADUALLY WEAKEN AND
   EVOLVE INTO AN OPEN WAVE WHILE TRANSLATING EWD FROM THE OZARK
   PLATEAU AND LOWER MS VALLEY TO THE MID ATLANTIC COAST BY SATURDAY
   MORNING.  AS THIS PROCESS OCCURS…LATEST MODEL GUIDANCE SUGGESTS
   THAT AN UPSTREAM VORTICITY MAXIMUM/JET STREAK WILL ROTATE THROUGH
   THE MEAN TROUGH BASE ACROSS THE TN VALLEY INTO VA/NC FRIDAY
   AFTERNOON INTO FRIDAY NIGHT.  THIS ERN U.S. WAVE WILL PRECEED A MORE
   INTENSE TROUGH WHICH WILL EVENTUALLY FORM INTO A CLOSED SYSTEM OVER
   THE LOWER CO VALLEY INTO NRN BAJA AND THE GULF OF CA.
  
   IN THE LOW LEVELS…SURFACE CYCLONE NEAR THE CONFLUENCE OF THE MS/OH
   RIVERS AT 10/12Z WILL DEVELOP ENEWD ACROSS NRN KY AND SRN
   WV…EVENTUALLY REACHING THE DELMARVA BY 11/12Z.  ATTENDANT COLD
   FRONT WILL PUSH EWD THROUGH THE TN VALLEY AND GULF STATES TO ALONG
   THE MID/SERN ATLANTIC COASTS BY SATURDAY MORNING.
  
   …OH/TN VALLEYS INTO THE CNTRL/ERN GULF STATES AND EWD TO THE
   CAROLINAS…
  
   EML/STEEP LAPSE RATE PLUME OBSERVED OVER THE SRN PLAINS THIS MORNING
   WILL BE ADVECTED EWD INTO THE REGION WITH WSWLY AIRFLOW
   REGIME…ALONG SRN THROUGH ERN PERIPHERIES OF MIDLEVEL TROUGH.
   WHILE WARM SECTOR BOUNDARY LAYER WILL NOT BE OVERLY MOIST /I.E.
   DEWPOINTS IN 50S OVER KY/TN TO LOWER/MID 60S OVER THE GULF
   STATES/…THESE STEEP LAPSE RATES COUPLED WITH GENERALLY COOL
   MIDLEVEL THERMODYNAMIC PROFILES WILL YIELD MLCAPE APPROACHING
   1000-1500 J/KG OVER THE TN VALLEY/CUMBERLAND PLATEAU…TO 1500-2000
   J/KG OVER THE CNTRL/ERN GULF STATES.
  
   TSTMS /SOME SEVERE/ ARE EXPECTED TO BE ONGOING FRIDAY MORNING WITHIN
   ZONE OF DEEP ASCENT AHEAD OF SURFACE LOW OVER PARTS OF THE LOWER OH
   AND LOWER MS VALLEYS…AS WELL AS WITHIN WAA REGIME FARTHER E ACROSS
   PARTS OF ERN TN/AL/NRN GA.  THE FORMER ACTIVITY WILL LIKELY INCREASE
   IN BOTH COVERAGE AND INTENSITY BY LATE MORNING/EARLY AFTERNOON
   ALONG/AHEAD OF COLD FRONT FROM CNTRL KY/MIDDLE TN SWD INTO AL AS
   STRONGER FORCING/HEIGHT FALLS ASSOCIATED WITH SECONDARY VORTICITY
   MAXIMUM ACT ON DESTABILIZING AIR MASS. 
  
   GIVEN THE STEEP LAPSE RATES/MODERATE INSTABILITY AND DEEP-LAYER
   SHEAR RANGING FROM 30-40 KT INVOF SURFACE LOW OVER KY TO 50-65 KT
   INTO MS/AL/GA…ENVIRONMENT WILL BE QUITE SUPPORTIVE OF EMBEDDED
   SUPERCELL STRUCTURES CAPABLE OF VERY LARGE HAIL AND DAMAGING WINDS.
   CURRENTLY…IT APPEARS THAT THE GREATEST TORNADO THREAT WILL EXIST
   ACROSS MIDDLE/ERN TN INTO NRN PARTS OF AL/GA AND PERHAPS AS FAR E AS
   WRN SC FRIDAY AFTERNOON INTO EVENING.  HERE…REINTENSIFICATION OF A
   SWLY LLJ WILL OCCUR IN RESPONSE TO ABOVE-MENTIONED…SECONDARY
   VORTICITY MAXIMUM RESULTING IN NOTABLY STRONGER LOW-LEVEL SHEAR
   /I.E. 0-1 KM SHEAR APPROACHING 30-35 KT/.  SHOULD FUTURE NUMERICAL
   GUIDANCE AND OBSERVATIONAL DATA CONTINUE TO SUGGEST A SIMILAR
   THREAT…A MODERATE RISK MAY BE REQUIRED IN SUBSEQUENT DAY ONE
   OUTLOOKS.
  
   PRE-FRONTAL CLUSTERS/BANDS OF SEVERE STORMS WILL CONTINUE FRIDAY
   NIGHT EWD THROUGH THE CNTRL/SRN APPALACHIANS AND PIEDMONT…
   EVENTUALLY INTO THE COASTAL PLAINS.  WHILE INSTABILITY WILL TEND TO
   DIMINISH WITH TIME…A STRONGLY SHEARED KINEMATIC ENVIRONMENT WILL
   CONTINUE TO FAVOR EMBEDDED SUPERCELL AND/OR BOWING STRUCTURES WILL
   THE THREAT FOR DAMAGING WINDS…HAIL AND PERHAPS TORNADOES.
  
   ..MEAD.. 04/09/2009

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