Crime Doesn’t Pay For Horn; Temps Don’t Warm For Us


1120 00Z NAM 850 mb 6Z Fri-Note the Moisture Content and Temps-a few flurries may get squeezed out

1120 00Z NAM 850 mb 6Z Fri-Note the Moisture Content and Temps-a few flurries may get squeezed out

The Cold Weather Just Won’t Go Away: Another cold front Thursday morning will lead in another parade of cold air. Wednesday’s high was 48 after morning lows in the teens and low 20’s. All of the leaves fell off at once on my tree “Horton.” For real. Tuesday leaves. Wednesday morning, none. Horton is now a 9 foot stick rising from the ground. I think “Kelsaroo” the hydrangia is done is going to bed for the winter as well. Good thing because we only get to the upper 30’s and low 40’s on Thursday with clouds increasing. Perhaps some meaningless flurries late Thursday or Friday morning when temperatures fall to the low to mid 20’s. Some sunshine Friday afternoon won’t get us out of the upper 30’s and Saturday looks lousy too. Mostly cloudy. Morning start in the mid-teens to low 20’s and highs again in the 30’s. Sunday we should get back to the upper 40’s.

Tom Horn

Tom Horn

On This Date in History: Tom Horn had worked as a US Army scout, deputy sherrif, and Pinkerton

Horn Looks A Little Heavier and Younger Here

Horn Looks A Little Heavier and Younger Here

Detective in the 19th Century. When General Nelson Miles had need of a “super-scout” to help track down Geronimo, he called on Tom Horn. It has been suggested that Horn even arranged for Geronimo’s surrender. Horn was no shrinking violet. While working for the Pinkerton Agency, he reported killed 17 men. His reputation was such that on one occasion he reportedly simply walked up to an accused robber and killer and announced that he had come for him. The man quietly surrendered rather than face Tom Horn. But, the detective business wasn’t exciting enough and Horn quit, saying, “It was too tame for me.”

In 1894 he was hired by the cattleman’s association in Wyoming to supposedly combat cattle rustlers but in reality was used as an enforcer against small ranchers and homesteaders who got in the way of the cattle barons. In effect, he was the law for the big shots and served as judge, jury and executioner receiving $300 to $600 for each man he took down. See, Horn didn’t see himself as murderer but instead believed that when men in authority, or even the law, hired him, he would be protected. It usually worked out that way. Horn said, “Killing is my specialty. I look at it as a business proposition and I think I have a corner on the market.” He usually lay in wait for his victim and then made his mark by placing a rock under the victim’s head.

Horn Making The Rope For His Own Gallows

Horn Making The Rope For His Own Gallows

But, the law caught up with Horn who was arrested in 1902 for the killing of a 14-year-old son of a settler the year before. In Cheyenne, the cattle barons paid for his defense and a sensational trial ensued with everyone thinking that he would be found not guilty. That was not to be the case. The prosecution had a legal reporter along with federal officer Joe LeFors and a deputy sheriff got a drunken Horn to supposedly confess to the killing. The “confession” was allowed in court and heard by a jury that was stacked with opponents of the cattlemen. Horn was convicted and on this date in 1903, Tom Horn went to the gallows after making the rope that was used in the hanging.

Steve McQueen’s 2nd to last movie was a biopic called Tom Horn with

McQueen Was a Great Tom Horn

McQueen Was a Great Tom Horn

Linda Evans, Slim Pickens and Richard Farnsworth. I guess the moral to the story is that no one is above the law and even if you get convicted of something you didn’t do, perhaps it is a justice of nature for all of the things that you did do but for which you were never caught. You may think that this held true for a certain Heismann Trophy, NFL Hall of Famer who is now in prison in Nevada.

A long bio of Horn. A shorter bio of Horn.

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