Women Had Right to Vote, Lost it, Then got back the right to vote
November 16, 2009

New Jersey Women Stormed To Take Back What Was Once Theirs

New Jersey Women Stormed To Take Back What Was Once Theirs

Early Suffrage Poster Featuring George Washington

Early Suffrage Poster Featuring George

On This Date in History: The original constitution of the state of New Jersey said that “all inhabitants” who met residency requirements and had a net worth of at least 50 pounds had the right to vote. I assume that it only meant whites but it certainly made no reference to women. The women of New Jersey apparently gave a collective yawn. They had not pushed for suffrage and there is no record of any woman voting prior to 1790.

Things went awry though in 1797 when a state legislature seat was up for grabs between Newark’s John Condict and William Crane of Elizabeth. Condict looked to be the winner until 75 women from Elizabeth showed up to vote for their favorite son. Condict still managed to hang on but the race was on for the female vote. Women were hauled to the polls in wagons and carriages by candidates in the elections that followed. (sound familiar?) Some of the ladies were even underage. But, in 1807, the freedom train came to a halt.

billysunday

Over 100 years after women of NJ lost the vote, Billy Sunday took up their cause

Once again, the players were Newark and Elizabeth and the issue was the location of a new courthouse. Women were tossed and pulled by both sides as they tried to get them to the polls and convince them of the merits of each side’s position. Hijinx were at a premium as even young boys dressed up as women to try to cast a ballot. The rank and file of the elites were “shocked” by this “saturnalia of corruption and abuse” and on this date in 1807 New Jersey lawmakers quickly adopted new voting laws that took away the vote from the ladies. It would take over 100 years for them to get it back.

Moral to the story: Don’t take your opportunities for granted and squander what you have.

7amWed

Wednesday 7 AM

Weather Bottom Line: Song remains the same as far as the forecast goes except that my great idea that things would get pushed back a bit seems to be out of favor with the machines.  This cut off low is just plodding along as it moves through its way on the downside of life.  Whenever you see an occluded front, that means that the storm is on the weakening phase of its lifecycle.  Both the GFS and the NAM advertise rain beginning on Tuesday morning, though the GFS is early morning and the NAM is mid morning.  Both carry rain through Wednesday night with totals of .86″ and .88″ respectively.  It won’t rain the whole time.  The graphic above depicts the occlusion already past us on Wednesay morning with our area in the dry slot between the front and the parent low.  So, if this were to come about as shown, then there would be a break before another round of showers.  My guess is that this guy is going so slow that we will be cloudy for the balance of the week, perhaps improving somewhat on Friday.  Temperatures will be closer to seasonal by then.

Woman Gets Amnesia After Sex; Nation Has Amnesia Regarding 1st Woman Elected to Congress
November 8, 2009

very-confused-woman

amnesiaWe’ve heard of amnesia.  Few of us have ever really encountered anyone actually getting amnesia and our knowledge of the condition is generally limited to tv shows or movies.  There was the recent case of the man in Seattle who apparently had amnesia.  Many people speculated that he was faking it.  But, amnesia is apparently more common than we think.  Transient Global Amnesia occurs with some frequency in people over 50.  It is triggered when there is strenuous activity.  That would include bowel movements.  That’s got to be some trauma…both the event that caused the amnesia and the resulting amnesia.  But, there is another fairly common causation.  Sex.  This woman suffered from amnesia after sex with her husband.  Oh, she finally recovered but she can’t recall one thing: having sex with her husband.  Experts say she must have had fun.

On This Date In History: The 19th Amendment to the Constitution that guaranteed women the right to vote was not ratified until August of 1920. However, on this date in 1916, Jeanette Rankin(bio) was basking in the glow of becoming the first woman elected to Congress on the previous day. How does that work?

Rep. Jeanette Ranking in Chicago 1917Well, western states were in a somewhat leadership position regarding suffragettes. Wyoming gave women the vote in 1869 when it was still a territory. Utah, Idaho and Colorado voted for the suffragettes by the turn of the century. One must remember, there is no such thing as a Federal Election. All elections are state or local. So, states can pass their own voting laws. Rankin was from Montana and after working in New York as a social worker and getting involved in the women’s suffrage movement. She moved home to Montana in 1914 because she believed that the western states offered the best opportunity to gain women’s suffrage due to their pioneering spirit that she thought gave more respect to women and their ability. She was right because shortly after she moved there, women in Montana got the right to vote. She was elected to Congress in 1916 with strong support from men and women. When she went to Washington, the nation looked to see if she could handle the office.

Rankinbook

Several books on Rankin Available (click image)

Handling the office was not an issue. What became an issue was her strongly held beliefs. She was elected as a Progressive Republican and she held strong pacifist views. When the vote to enter World War I came up, she voted against it. Even though 55 other Congressmen voted against it, she was ridiculed by many as not having the ability to take on the responsibility of national office. Others though said she showed strong, courageous leadership in her vote. She remained in office through World War II. She held on to her convictions and voted against that war too. She is the only member of Congress to have voted against the United States entry in both world wars. This time, she voted alone.

rankin_jeanette

Old Gal Still Stirred things up in 1960's

Seems Jeanette was one of those who thought that President Roosevelt had deliberately provoked the attack on Pearl Harbor. That didn’t sit well with anyone, including her constituents in Montana. So, instead of being defeated, she declined to run in 1943. But, she wasn’t done. In 1968, the 88 year old Rankin led a march on Washington to protest the Vietnam War. Rankin died in 1973 but you’ve to admire her. While I would not necessarily agree with her positions, one has to acknowledge that, unlike most politicians, she had a core belief and never knuckled under and remained active in promoting that belief until her last breath. Rather remarkable on many levels if you think about it.  The Jeanette Rankin Foundation awards scholarships or low-income women over the age of 35.

12zTue

Tuesday 7 AM wet drive to work?

Weather Bottom Line:  A spectacular Sunday will lead us into an almost equally as nice Monday.  Perhaps it’s time to use up that extra sick day for the year.  Highs again will be in the low 70′s with some folks perhaps pushing the mid 70′s.  But, clouds will be on the increase late in the day.  A cold front is sweeping down from the west and northwest.  Chances for rain will start to increase late Monday evening and continue to rise into Tuesday when there will be a pretty fair chance for rain and maybe some rumbles of thunder.  However, I suspect that the best chance for rain will be sometime before sunrise to just after midday so there will probably be insufficient heating to create much noise.  The rest of the week into the weekend look pretty quiet with highs in the low 60′s with mid 60′s perhaps by Friday.  It is this front that will pick up Hurricane Ida.

America’s First Woman President
September 25, 2009

First Woman US President?

First Woman US President?

The Happy Couple

The Happy Couple

On This Date in History:  In the most recent presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton was considered the front runner for the nominee of the Democratic Party until she was bested by Barack Obama who eventually won the election as President of the United States.  It was seen a race for the potential for firsts.  If Obama won the election, he would be the first African American president in the nation’s history.  If Clinton won, she would be the first female  president in the nation’s history.  Or would she?  Certainly Ms. Clinton would have been the first elected president of the United States but there are those who say we’ve already had a de facto female president.   The sequence of events that led to that conclusion began on this date in 1919.

President Woodrow Wilson was making a public speaking engagement in Pueblo, Colorado when he suddenly collapsed.  The president had suffered a serious stroke.  Now, the president’s wife was Edith.  She was a descendant of Pocahontas who had little formal education which contrasted greatly with Wilson, who had a PhD.  Edith was a political neophyte as she was not his wife when he was first elected in 1912.  In fact, she couldn’t even remember who she voted for in the 1912 election.    One thing that she had in common with the president was that each one had suffered the death of a spouse.  It was but a quirk of fate that Edith met the bereaved president and they soon married.  Apparently, Wilson needed female companionship greatly and when Edith Bolling Galt became Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, she became a very close confidante.

Working on a Crossword Puzzle of Reviewing Policy?

Working on a Crossword Puzzle of Reviewing Policy?

So, when Wilson became disabled by his stroke, she was able to quickly pick up the reigns and then some.  She barred everyone from seeing the ailing president.  Cabinet officers and trusted aides alike were kept from seeing Wilson.   Edith insisted that she had no role in executive decisions saying, “the only decision that was mine was what was important and…when to present matters to my husband.”  Well, even if her role was limted to what she admitted, then she was still a key figure because it was up to her what the president saw and when he saw it.  She was the sole arbitor of what was important and what he needed to consider.  It’s unclear whether she was behind the public reports regarding Wilson’s health, but the public was told that the president was recovering.  The truth as that he was partially paralyzed and nearly blind.  That would mean that he was probably unable to read any documents or correspondence and so Edith would be in charge of the content of just about anything that he heard.  The Washington Post in 2007 revealed the new information has come to light that confirms both Edith and the doctors conspired to cover-up the severity of Wilson’s medical condition.

Edith Handled Correspondence But Her Signature is rarely found by collectors

Edith Handled Correspondence But Her Signature is rarely found by collectors

She became known as the “Iron Queen,”  “Presidentress” and “The Regent” with one senator referring to the situation as the “Petticoat Government.”  When there was a presidential address to Congress scheduled, the message was sent  in the form of a patchworks of reports from Cabinet members.  Those reports included penciled in corrections by Edith, as if she was grading the school work of a child.  Lawmakers were convinced that Wilson never knew nothing about the message to Congress or much of anything else that was coming from his office.  The last year’s of his presidency are largely seen a ineffective and many suggest that the government was tightlycontrolled by the First Lady.  Here is an excerpt from an Edith Wilson biography that illustrates the level of her control:

Lansing: Fired by Edith?

Lansing: Fired by Edith?

“When the Secretary of State Robert Lansing conducted a series of Cabinet meeting without the President, the first being in October 1919, Edith Wilson considered it an act of disloyalty and pushed for his replacement with the more acquiescent Bainbridge Colby. Wilson requested Lansing’s resignation in February 1920. As her husband began partially to recover, she also guarded access to him from advisors and other political figures. When Republican Senator Albert Fall was sent to investigate the President’s true condition, Edith Wilson helped arrange Wilson in bed to be presentable and sat through the brief meeting, taking verbatim notes.

In September 1919, Edith Wilson refused to have the U.S. accept the credentials of British representative Edward Grey who had been sent by his government to aid in the push for ratification of Wilson’s League of Nations unless Grey dismissed one of his aides who was known to have made demeaning jokes at her expense.”

Wilson died in 1924.  He is buried at the National Cathedral in Washington DC.  Actually, I believe I saw his place of final rest in the Washington National Cathedral.   Edith carefully preserved memorabilia and managed his legacy.  At the age of 89, she attended the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy.  Shortly thereafter, Edith Wilson died and, as part of her obituary, the New York Times observed that “some went so far as to characterize her as the first woman president of the United State.”  There are those today who agree that, without the title, sympathetically Edith Wilson was indeed the first woman president of the United States

SPC Severe Probability Sat AM to Sun AM

SPC Severe Probability Sat AM to Sun AM

Weather Bottom Line:   There was a flash flood watch for our area through Saturday but since no wide spread rain materialized in the Friday’s gloom, it was cancelled.  The concern was the amount of rain we had received and the amount expected.  There is a cold front moving our way which will take us from a warm, moist airmass to one that is dry and coolish.  From tropical maritime to polar continental.  I had suggested some days ago that it was in this transition on Saturday that we may have some strong storms.  As it is, the SPC does not feel the threat warrants a designation of a slight risk for severe thunderstorms, but it does put parts of our area under the dreaded 5% risk of severe storms.  So, my assertion of the potential for strong storms remains, but the probability of any of those storms turning technically severe is minimal.  Here’s what the SPC has to say about our region:

UPPER LOW THAT HAS MEANDERED ABOUT THE CNTRL PLAINS REGION FOR THE
   LAST FEW DAYS WILL FINALLY BE KICKED EWD AS UPSTREAM HEIGHTS BEGIN
   TO FALL IN RESPONSE TO STRONG SPEED MAX ALONG THE U.S./CANADIAN
   BORDER.  IN FACT LATEST MODEL GUIDANCE SUGGEST UPPER LOW WILL OPEN
   UP ACROSS ERN KS/MO EARLY IN THE PERIOD THEN QUICKLY EJECT INTO ERN
   OH/WRN PA BY THE END OF THE PERIOD.  AS THIS OCCURS A POCKET OF
   FAIRLY COLD MID LEVEL TEMPERATURES…H5 ON THE ORDER OF MINUS
   16-18C…WILL OVERSPREAD MUCH OF MO/IL BY MID DAY…THEN INTO IND BY
   MID AFTERNOON.  ALTHOUGH MOISTURE IS SOMEWHAT LIMITED ACROSS THIS
   REGION IT APPEARS FOCUSED ASCENT WITHIN THE EXIT REGION OF UPPER JET
   SHOULD ENHANCE THE PROSPECT FOR ROBUST CONVECTION CAPABLE OF
   GENERATING HAIL.  A FEW STORMS COULD PRODUCE MARGINALLY SEVERE HAIL
   WITHIN STEEPER LAPSE RATE ENVIRONMENT…PRIMARILY BETWEEN 18-00Z
   TIME FRAME NORTH OF MID LEVEL JET CORE.

Rain Total Forecast For Saturday and Sunday

Rain Total Forecast For Saturday and Sunday

We will have a round of heavy rain with some accumulation totals of 1-2 inches but the SPC and Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) don’t look for particularly nasty weather or excessive rainfall.  But, the sliver of the rain totals of greater than 3 inches has expanded since the last forecast and remains just to our east, encompassing most of east Kentucky.  So, it’s worth keeping up on.  Once the front moves through, we turn drier on Sunday…should be a great day.  Then we get the follow-up shot of cooler air.  I still suspect that on Monday night, there will be several temperature reports in the 40′s and Tuesday afternoon some folks may not get out of the 60′s.  Fall is here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 35 other followers